Infographic

This week in CEP 811 we were asked to create an infographic that defined Maker Education.  I decided to highlight four of the eight mathematical practices from Common Core, that I believed to align with Maker education.  Throughout this course I have learned to explore new topics each week and share out what I have learned, this is exactly how a math classroom should work as well according to Common Core.  Students should explore and be ready to fail, but to persevere through the problem in order to gain understanding.  This is the idea that drove my infographic, because I thought the beginning of the course how I learned to overcome my failure and move forward with making.

Maker Education wants students to have a hands on experience and explore in order to create something of their own.  Students also need time in order to develop their ideas, and resources in order for implementation of their design.  Again, this connects to math because each student learns at their own pace and in different ways, so we as teachers need to provide the tools necessary for their understanding.

I enjoyed making this infographic and showing how four mathematical practices can be used in Maker Education.  Although, I did struggle with the template chosen but I believe it is because I was using the free version of picktochart and would need to upgrade.

References:

Childress, S., & Benson, S. (2014). Personalized Learning for Every Student Every Day. Phi Delta Kappan, 95(8), 33-38. doi:10.1177/003172171409500808

Sheridan, K. Halverson, E.R., Litts, B.K., Brahms, L, Jacobs-Priebe, L., & Owens, T. (2014) Learning in the making: A comparative case-study of three maker spaces. Harvard Educational Review, 84(4), 505-565. /content/SS15/CEP/811/SS15-CEP-811-733-97EFZZ-EL-14-204/Sheridanetal_ComparativeCaseStudyofThreeMakerSpaces_2014.pdf

Standards for Mathematical Practice. (n.d.). Retrieved June 26, 2016, from http://www.corestandards.org/Math/Practice/

Infographic Link

math-practices-use-maker-education.png

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s